Content, Technology. Or is it: Technology, Content?

Tech tricks and tips for the social good.

Facebook Groups – an NPO’s Secret Weapon. Part I

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Chances are you belong to at least one Facebook group… is it your neighborhood association’s FB page?  Your child’s sports team? Or maybe you belong to a location-neutral group organized around a personal interest, like sailing.

Take a closer look at those pages. What’s missing?

Actually two things are missing.

The first is sponsored links/posts.
At this writing, FB groups pages are free from clutter. The page contains only updates posted by people who belong to the group. There are no sponsored links/suggested posts.  It’s a space that is not strewn with curated content at all.

The second missing element is advertising.
Every post to a group page remains strictly about that group’s interests.  The stream of tailored ads – based on what I might have looked at online – are blissfully muted!

This hiding-in-plain-sight space is a great tool for NPO’s.

Your org can start an affinity group around your mission, or related topics. For example, your org saves cats. Start a FB group about spotted cats, or cats with “mustaches” or extra toes. You can invite the org’s regular FB fans to join, and with effective key-word choices new fans from beyond your usual pool join in.

The affinity page will attract experts and novices alike; consider using the page as a space to position your org as a thought leader in your field. But don’t over-do it – readers will see constant references to your org as spam, and stay away.

Start the conversation, and let community members “talk amongst themselves” about the topic. Some posts might have links you can curate  onto your org’s main FB page.

One caveat – group pages need to be started by individuals, not businesses or organizations. Be prepared to post as yourself.

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2 thoughts on “Facebook Groups – an NPO’s Secret Weapon. Part I

  1. Interesting..I never noticed the lack of ads in the group pages. Great idea to make use of them for a non profit.

    Like

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